Grass-Fed Beef

By  BARRY ESTABROOK | PHOTOS BY CANDICE VIVIEN

I lost my appetite for mass-produced, grain-fed beef about a decade ago while speeding along Interstate 5 in California’s Central Valley on a cloudy winter afternoon. My epiphany came as I passed a feedlot. Occupying more than a square mile, the complex of fences and feed troughs could accommodate up to a quarter of a million cattle. They spent the last months of their lives in fetid conditions jammed together shoulder-to-shoulder on top of their own excrement and, depending on the season, goopy mud or a haze of thick brownish dust. I could not see a single blade of grass. Most memorable, however, was the putrid sulfurous stench. It somehow seeped in through the closed window of my car miles before I passed the feedlot and lingered long afterward.

I didn’t want that memory to come between me and my grilled sirloins, so I switched almost exclusively to the meat of grass-fed cattle, who live their entire lives grazing on open pasture, as cows are meant to do. In part, I made the change for reasons of animal welfare, but I have learned that going grass-fed also contributed to my own welfare.

A few years ago, I joined about 100 farmers, chefs, and academics at a conference that convinced me of the healthful benefits of grass-fed beef at the Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture just north of New York City for the release of a detailed report on grass-fed beef titled “Back to Grass.” Citing many studies, the report’s authors concluded, “Pasture-raised, grass-fed beef is healthier than conventional grain-finished, especially when grass-fed cattle have access to healthy, ample, and diverse pasture.”

For starters, grass-fed beef contains less than half the total fat per serving of grain-fed, according to an analysis undertaken by Susan Duckett of Clemson University, and contains far higher percentages of so-called “good” fats. Although grass-fed and grain-fed meat contain the same amounts of saturated fat, which the American Heart Association says should be restricted because it can increase cholesterol levels in the blood, not all saturated fats have the same impact. Studies show that grain-finished beef has much more myristic and palmitic fatty acids, both of which raise cholesterol. Grass-fed is higher in stearic acid, which does not raise cholesterol levels.

An extensive review led by Cynthia Daley of the University of California Chico published in Nutrition Journal in 2010 reported that research spanning three decades consistently suggests that “grass-only diets can significantly alter the fatty composition and improve the overall antioxidant content of beef.” Antioxidants prevent damage to cells.

She went on to conclude, “Regardless of the genetic makeup gender, age, species, or geographic location [of cattle] direct contrasts between grass and grain rations consistently demonstrate significant differences in the overall fatty acid profile and antioxidant content found in their lipid deposits and body tissues.”

Like many, I take a daily supplement of fish oil to make sure I’m getting adequate amounts of beneficial omega-3 fatty acids, which tend to be lacking in the typical North American diet. But research indicates that I would almost certainly be better off skipping the pills and getting my omega-3s from a well-balanced diet, including fatty fish and, as it turns out, grass-fed beef.

According to Daley, omega-3 acids can play a crucial role in preventing heart disease, arthritis, hardening of the arteries, and cancer. They even lower the incidence of depression, memory loss, and Alzheimer’s disease. Grass-fed beef contains higher concentrations of omega-3 acids than grain-fed.

Cattle are designed to eat grasses, not grain. Putting them in a feedlot with a diet of grain raises the acidity of their digestive systems, which reduces the production of compounds called conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) by a factor of three, compared to production in animals that eat lush green grass. Numerous animal studies have shown that CLAs can prevent cancers and hardening of the arteries, as well as slow the onset of type-2 diabetes. Some research indicates that CLAs might even help obese humans lose body fat.

Grass-fed beef is also packed with vitamins. Beta-carotenes are precursors to vitamin A, which is important for good vision, bone growth, healthy skin and mucous membranes, and immune function. In a 2005 article in the journal Meat Science, a group of Argentinian researchers led by Adriana Descalzo reported that grass-fed beef delivered fully seven times as much beta-carotene as grain-finished. Similarly, grass-fed beef was found to contain nearly three times as much vitamin E, which protects against heart disease and cancer.

As you can imagine, cramming cattle together by the tens, or even hundreds, of thousands on vast feedlots and forcing them to eat an unnatural diet of grain leaves them susceptible to a range of pathogens—some of which might land on your countertop and plate.

To keep animals in their care from getting sick, three quarters of large feedlot operators routinely feed antibiotics to their cattle, even those that are perfectly healthy, “as a health and production management tool,” in the words of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. This practice creates ideal conditions for the development of antibiotic-resistant germs, which some of the most potent drugs in the modern medical arsenal cannot destroy—so-called superbugs.

The acidic conditions in the guts of grain-fed cattle not only hamper production of beneficial fatty acids, but make the animals perfect incubators for E. coli 0157:H7, a bacterium that has evolved to tolerate the acidity of our own stomachs. Although it does not sicken cattle, resistant E. coli from feedlots can spread to humans, either on meat brought home from the store or via contaminated air and water. The result is one of the most worrisome foodborne diseases in the country. E. coli infections can cause nausea, bloody diarrhea, kidney failure, and in some cases lead to a long, lingering death, not a great ad for one of Americans’ favorite meats.

In its 2015 “Beef Report,” Consumer Reports revealed that laboratory-tested samples of beef produced on feedlots were twice as likely as sustainably produced samples to carry bacteria resistant to two or more classes of antibiotics. Three different strains of MRSA, a potentially fatal, drug-resistant Staphylococcus bacterium, were found on conventional meat; none on sustainably produced cuts. Overall, grass-fed specimens had a three times lower likelihood of carrying any resistant bacteria compared to conventional.

As Frederick Provenza of Utah State University reported in the journal Frontiers in Nutrition, “Animals foraging on phytochemically diverse pastures require less anthelmintics [drugs that kill parasites] and antibiotics than animals foraging on monoculture pastures or in feedlots.” In short, pastured cows are healthier than those stuffed with grain. Every month or so my wife and I indulge in a proudly all-American dinner. The menu consists of a wedge of iceberg lettuce with a buttermilk-based blue cheese dressing, oven-baked potato wedges, and hamburgers. It’s thoroughly retro in every way but one: The burgers are made from American-raised grass-fed beef. It’s nice to know that the meat contains only 10 percent fat. And since we tend to err on the rare side when we grill burgers, we like the security of knowing that the patties between the buns are very unlikely to come with a side order of pathogens.

But in the end, what keeps us coming back is the flavor: tangy, moist, and deliciously beefy. Perfect, when all you want is a burger that is truly good—in all respects.

 

Visit our friends @ https://panoramameats.com/ for more info on things like who is raising the beef, how they are raised and product availabe.

 

Try This! New Fruits & Veggies to Enjoy

By Healthy Living Consultant Shari Steinbach MS, RDN

Did you know that most shoppers actually buy the same five or six produce items each week? If you crave something new, Buehler’s produce department offers some of the best variety around. If you aren’t exploring our options and trying new products, you may be missing out on some delicious items that can add excitement, and a wide of health benefits to your meals and snacks.

Below is a guide to a few items you may not have tried to help you venture outside of your produce comfort zone. The next time you shop Buehler’s, add one or more of these items to your list and explore other products you may want to try. To make things more fun, challenge your family to try one new produce item each time you grocery shop this month. Who knows, you may find some new favorites! And remember, eating a wide range of fruits and veggies increases the variety of vitamins and minerals you give your body to promote overall health and wellbeing.

Parsnips – Parsnips are a root vegetable packed with fiber and vitamin C. If you’re a fan of carrots this is a great product to try! They are creamy yellow-beige in color and are usually cooked but can also be eaten raw. Parsnips can be used in the same ways as carrots, but they are actually sweeter. They can be baked, sauteed, steamed, mashed or roasted and are delicious in soups and stews.

Mango – Mangos are one of the most popular fruits in the world. They are the succulent, aromatic fruits of an evergreen tree.  In addition to sumptuous tropical flavor, mangos deliver nutritional value – 3/4 cup of mango provides 50% of your daily vitamin C, 8% of your daily Vitamin A and 8% of your daily vitamin B6 along with 7% of your daily fiber. Use mangos in smoothies, fruit salads, salsa, black bean dishes. Check out more recipes here and learn how to cut a mango here.

Jackfruit – This tropical tree fruit is the largest tree-borne fruit in the world, weighing up to 40 lbs. or more. A 3-1/2 oz. serving has about 95 calories and 2 grams of protein along with a variety of vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals that have health benefits. Unripe jackfruit has a neutral flavor that pairs will with savory dishes and its stringy texture makes a good vegan substitute for pulled pork or chicken. Ripe jackfruit has a sweet, tropical flavor that works well as a snack or added to sweet dishes. If you’re looking for a convenient way to try Jackfruit, Buehler’s sells The Jackfruit Company recipe-ready, seasoned products.

EggplantA slightly sweet, tender fruit covered with a shiny skin that ranges in color from dark purple, which is the most familiar, to red, yellow, green, or white. Eggplants are members of the nightshade family that include the potato and tomato, which makes them technically a fruit but they are generally thought of and prepared as a vegetable. Eggplant is low in calories and fat but high in fiber. It is a source of potassium, iron and protein. Eggplant is excellent when stuffed with a variety of ingredients or cooked using one of several methods, such as sautéing, frying, broiling, baking, grilling, or slowly cooking in meat, rice, or cheese dishes and stews. When prepared on their own they are sometimes breaded or battered before cooking and can also be substituted for pasta in lasagna dishes.

Asian PearsThey are true pears, but look more like apples and they are ready to eat as soon as you buy them. Asian pears are firm but will continue to ripen, so if you’re not going to get to them quickly, keep them in the refrigerator—but let them come back up to room temperature before eating to enjoy their full flavor. Asian pears are great used in recipes or simply eaten out of hand. Their crispness works well in slaws and salads – dice and add them to chicken salad; slice thinly and toss them with mixed lettuces, nuts, and vinaigrette; or julienne and add them to a slaw. They pair wonderfully with pungent cheeses like blue or Gouda, and can be sautéed and served with pork.

 

Root to Leaf Pinterest Board

Celebrate National Fruits and Vegetables Month in September by using everything from root to leaf and in between.

How to Use Radish Greens (pin this page: https://www.loveandlemons.com/radish-greens/)

Carrot Top Chimichurri (pin this page: https://www.forkintheroad.co/carrot-top-chimichurri/)

8 Tasty Ways to Use Broccoli Stems (https://www.eatingbirdfood.com/broccoli-stems/)

Vegetarian Corn Cob Broth (https://www.tastingtable.com/cook/recipes/corn-stock-summer-cob-fresh-recipe)

Amazing Uses for Citrus Peels (https://www.thespruce.com/amazing-uses-for-citrus-peels-1708647)

Three Ways to Eat Watermelon Rind (https://www.watermelon.org/the-slice/three-ways-to-eat-watermelon-rind/)

7 Uses for Leftover Apple Peels (https://www.thekitchn.com/7-ways-to-use-leftover-apple-peels-236766)

Banana Peel Carnitas (https://sweetpotatosoul.com/banana-peel-recipe-vegan-carnitas/)

Try This! New Fruits & Veggies to Enjoy

By Healthy Living Consultant Shari Steinbach MS, RDN

Did you know that most shoppers actually buy the same five or six produce items each week? If you crave something new, Buehler’s produce department offers some of the best variety around. If you aren’t exploring our options and trying new products, you may be missing out on some delicious items that can add excitement, and a wide of health benefits to your meals and snacks.

Below is a guide to a few items you may not have tried to help you venture outside of your produce comfort zone. The next time you shop Buehler’s, add one or more of these items to your list and explore other products you may want to try. To make things more fun, challenge your family to try one new produce item each time you grocery shop this month. Who knows, you may find some new favorites! And remember, eating a wide range of fruits and veggies increases the variety of vitamins and minerals you give your body to promote overall health and wellbeing.

Parsnips – Parsnips are a root vegetable packed with fiber and vitamin C. If you’re a fan of carrots this is a great product to try! They are creamy yellow-beige in color and are usually cooked but can also be eaten raw. Parsnips can be used in the same ways as carrots, but they are actually sweeter. They can be baked, sauteed, steamed, mashed or roasted and are delicious in soups and stews.

Mango – Mangos are one of the most popular fruits in the world. They are the succulent, aromatic fruits of an evergreen tree.  In addition to sumptuous tropical flavor, mangos deliver nutritional value – 3/4 cup of mango provides 50% of your daily vitamin C, 8% of your daily Vitamin A and 8% of your daily vitamin B6 along with 7% of your daily fiber. Use mangos in smoothies, fruit salads, salsa, black bean dishes. Check out more recipes here and learn how to cut a mango here.

Jackfruit – This tropical tree fruit is the largest tree-borne fruit in the world, weighing up to 40 lbs. or more. A 3-1/2 oz. serving has about 95 calories and 2 grams of protein along with a variety of vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals that have health benefits. Unripe jackfruit has a neutral flavor that pairs will with savory dishes and its stringy texture makes a good vegan substitute for pulled pork or chicken. Ripe jackfruit has a sweet, tropical flavor that works well as a snack or added to sweet dishes. If you’re looking for a convenient way to try Jackfruit, Buehler’s sells The Jackfruit Company recipe-ready, seasoned products.

EggplantA slightly sweet, tender fruit covered with a shiny skin that ranges in color from dark purple, which is the most familiar, to red, yellow, green, or white. Eggplants are members of the nightshade family that include the potato and tomato, which makes them technically a fruit but they are generally thought of and prepared as a vegetable. Eggplant is low in calories and fat but high in fiber. It is a source of potassium, iron and protein. Eggplant is excellent when stuffed with a variety of ingredients or cooked using one of several methods, such as sautéing, frying, broiling, baking, grilling, or slowly cooking in meat, rice, or cheese dishes and stews. When prepared on their own they are sometimes breaded or battered before cooking and can also be substituted for pasta in lasagna dishes.

Asian PearsThey are true pears, but look more like apples and they are ready to eat as soon as you buy them. Asian pears are firm but will continue to ripen, so if you’re not going to get to them quickly, keep them in the refrigerator—but let them come back up to room temperature before eating to enjoy their full flavor. Asian pears are great used in recipes or simply eaten out of hand. Their crispness works well in slaws and salads – dice and add them to chicken salad; slice thinly and toss them with mixed lettuces, nuts, and vinaigrette; or julienne and add them to a slaw. They pair wonderfully with pungent cheeses like blue or Gouda, and can be sautéed and served with pork.

5 Ways to Enjoy the Power of Cauliflower

By Healthy Living Consultant Annette Maggi, MS, RDN, LD, FAND

No matter what eating plan you follow (plant-forward, low carb, Mediterranean Diet, Whole 30), cauliflower is the perfect vegetable to include with just 20 calories and 4 grams carbohydrates per half-cup serving. Buehler’s offers a variety of forms – everything from riced cauliflower to whole heads to tots and hashbrowns – making it easy to add this powerhouse veggie to your weekly menus. Here are five ways to enjoy the power of cauliflower:

Roast the Whole Head: Trim and clean a whole head of cauliflower. Mix garlic, cumin, chili powder, salt and pepper into a cup of non-fat, plain Greek yogurt. Place cauliflower on lightly greased baking sheet. Spread generously with yogurt-spice mixture. Bake at 400 degrees for 30-40 minutes.

Taco Tuesday Tortilla Take-Over: Make veggie tortillas by first cooking about 4 cups of riced cauliflower (available fresh or frozen at Buehler’s). Put cooked vegetable into lightweight kitchen towel, twist towel to remove moisture from cauliflower. Mix cauliflower with two eggs, salt, pepper, cumin and Cheyenne pepper. Mound ¼ cup scoops onto baking sheet lined with parchment paper and use spatula to flatten into circles. Bake at 375 degrees for 8-9 minutes, flip tortillas and cook for another 8-9 minutes. Serve immediately with your favorite taco fillings.

Cauliflower Steaks: Trim and clean a large, whole head of cauliflower. Cut into 1-inch thick slices. Lightly brush each side with vegetable oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and place on parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake at 400 degrees for 30-35 minutes, flipping once during process. Serve topped with marinara sauce and parmesan cheese, pesto, or chimichurri sauce.

Cauliflower Mac and Cheese: Cut head of cauliflower into florets. Toss lightly with vegetable oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast on baking sheet at 450 degrees for 10-15 minutes, until tender and crisp. Heat ½ cup 2% milk with one tablespoon butter just to warm. Slowly add 1 cup shredded cheddar cheese, stirring to create cheese sauce. Toss cauliflower with cheese sauce and serve.

Global Rice Options: For Greek-inspired rice, cook and cool cauliflower rice; add chopped cucumbers, tomatoes, olives, onion, parsley, and feta cheese and top with a drizzle of olive oil and lemon juice. As a side for Asian dishes, cook cauliflower rice with garlic, scallions, red bell pepper, fresh ginger, frozen peas, rice vinegar, and soy sauce. Add Sriracha for a heat kick. For a Mexican flare, cook cauliflower rice with garlic, jalapeno, onion, cumin, paprika, chopped tomatoes, cilantro and lime juice.

 

 

“Buehler’s Fresh Foods would like to thank all of our customers and team members who went above and beyond this year in raising money for our community food banks during the Harvest for Hunger campaign.  I’m proud to say that each one of our stores exceeded their goals and raised the most donations ever, since we started the campaign 14 years ago.  We thank the Akron Canton Foodbank and their outstanding team who work hard to battle food insecurity every day.”  Paul Stefaniuk, Vice President of Operations at Buehler’s Fresh Foods.

Buehler’s Fresh Foods raised $172,488, which translates into 689,952 meals, through our register campaign, fun employee contests, and food bins. Everyone involved in this campaign recognizes the continued struggle for folks to put food on their tables due to the pandemic and how clearly vital the foodbank is to a multitude of families.

The entire Buehler’s team passionately worked together to make this campaign a success for the Foodbanks and all who benefit from their mission. 

“Buehler’s Fresh Foods is a one-of-a-kind partner in the regional fight against hunger.  Their deep local roots and employee owners bring a sense of community and pride to their outstanding work and generous philanthropy” said Dan Flowers, President and CEO of the Akron-Canton Regional Foodbank. “Throughout the pandemic, they have been courageous innovators in service that chains across the industry have modeled.  At the same time, Buehler’s staff and shoppers have raised an incredible amount of money in support of hunger-relief efforts.  When the story of this era in our history is written, the courage, ingenuity and deep sense of community exhibited by this exemplary partner in the fight against hunger will always be in the headlines to us at the Akron-Canton Regional Foodbank.  Our deepest respect and thanks to everyone involved in the Harvest for Hunger Campaign at Buehler’s Fresh Foods. “

When asked about how this campaign was different from previous years, Lisa Teuscher, a Service & Facilities Manager, commented, “I believe many people are truly grateful for not having to stress about food; especially given the amount of media coverage that has been given to those struggling due to the ongoing pandemic.  This gratitude may have contributed to many people wanting to help others”.

“Our customers were happy to be helping take a bite out of hunger for those affected by the pandemic!”, said Service & Facilities Manager, JoAnne Vrtacnik.

Laurie Adrian, a Buehler’s manager, stated, “I believe people are feeling better about getting out as well as peoples’ generous spirit during Covid and helping those in need.”

A few facts about the Foodbank:

  • The Akron-Canton Regional Foodbank distributes food and other essential items through its network of more than 500 food pantries, hot meal sites, shelters, children and senior programs and other hunger-relief programs in Carroll, Holmes, Medina, Portage, Stark, Summit, Tuscarawas and Wayne counties.
  • The Foodbank’s eight-county region has seen an increase in the number of people facing food insecurity because of COVID-19. Food insecurity affects 1 in 6 individuals and 1 in 4 children.
  • The COVID-19 pandemic caused a significant increase in the number of people seeking emergency food assistance. 30 percent of families visiting a pantry within the Foodbank’s network were visiting for the very first time, meaning they’ve never needed to seek help before.
  • Distributed the equivalent of 27.4 million meals to the local community in 2020
  • Delivered more than 1,000 food orders directly to hunger-relief programs with the help of the Ohio National Guard, saving them valuable time and resources.
  • Made more than 12,000 deliveries directly to home-bound families and seniors in need through a cutting-edge partnership with DoorDash, United Way of Summit & Medina and CARE, the Cooperative Assistance & Relief Everywhere, Inc.

Buehler’s Fresh Foods has proudly supported the Akron-Canton Foodbank as a Harvest for Hunger participant for the past fourteen years. We want to do our part to end hunger in each of the communities we serve.

Our partnership with the Akron-Canton Foodbank aligns with our corporate values and goals, hence our continued relationship. We are an organization committed to putting people first and this campaign is all about taking care of people in need in our communities.

About Buehler’s Fresh Foods

Buehler’s Fresh Foods grocery store was founded in 1929 by E.L. Buehler and his wife, Helen. The family moved the business in 1932 to Wooster, and, after four generations, grew to 13 stores serving the northeast Ohio market. In 2017, Buehler’s became an ESOP (employee stock ownership program) with the belief that selling to their own employees was the best way to assure the continuation of the innovative and creative spirit which made the chain a benchmark for independent grocers. 

Buehler’s Fresh Foods operates thirteen Buehler’s Fresh Foods supermarkets located in Wooster (2), Orrville, Wadsworth, Medina (2), Ashland, New Philadelphia, Dover, Jackson Township (Canton), Coshocton, Portage Lakes (Green) and Massillon, Ohio.

Buehler’s Fresh Foods is committed to environmentally responsible behavior, local sourcing of product and supporting the communities in which we operate. For more information visit www.buehlers.com.

The Connection between Food Choices and Planet Health

April 22 is celebrated as Earth Day around the world. It’s planned as a day to raise awareness of how all the decisions we make impact the health of our planet as well as things we can do in our daily lives to fight for a clean environment.

Did you know that one of the top four things that impacts planet health are the food choices we make? Food choices, from shopping to preparing to eating to storing, can impact greenhouse gases produced and what ends up in landfills.

Consider the following tips for celebrating Earth Day and planet health on any day of the year!

  • Buy fresh, frozen and canned fruits and vegetables. Fresh produce is one of the most common foods that gets wasted. When grocery shopping at your favorite Buehler’s, buy enough fresh produce for the next 2-3 days as well as produce items that last longer such as carrots and potatoes. Buy canned fruits and vegetables for use in soups, stews, stir fries, oatmeal bakes and yogurt parfaits later in the week. Choose frozen options, which are easily portioned out for smoothies or quick additions to lunch salads.
  • Enjoy plant-forward meals more often. Plant-forward eating habits celebrate plants and emphasize them in meals and snacks. It doesn’t mean giving up meat, poultry and fish, just shifting the balance to enjoy more plant-based foods. Think about adding beautiful fruits and vegetables, hearty beans and whole grains, and crunchy nuts to daily eating habits. Try our make once, eat twice recipes for Plant-Powered Black Bean and Beef Blend, Mexican Lasagna, and Tuesday Tacos.  
  • Use Buehler’s Healthy Living Vegan tags. Plant foods have a lower carbon footprint, and our Vegan Healthy Living tags throughout the store help you easily find these choices and add them to your shopping cart.
  • Use the entire food item. Did you know that broccoli stalks, when peeled and sliced, make a great snack? Or that you can save carrots tops and ends, onion peels, and other trimmings from vegetables to make a great stock for use in soups and other recipes?
  • Minimize food waste. Set aside one night each week for “Leftover Dinners.” Use leftover meat and veggies to make quesadillas. Cook down fruits which are looking sad as a sauce to have on pancakes, waffles, chicken or pork. If bread has gone stale, drizzle it with olive oil, smear with a cut tomato, and warm in the oven.

Do you have a favorite tip managing food waste? Share it with us on our Facebook page.

Consuming more plant-based foods is good for people and the planet!

If you’re wondering how to add more nutritious plant foods to your meals join Buehler’s Registered Dietitians for a virtual cook-along and learn how to make a delicious, Plant-Powered Black Bean and Beef Blend along with 2 simple recipes – Mexican Lasagna and Stuffed Burrito Peppers.

Below you will find the recipes and a shopping list of ingredients you will need to participate. Buehler’s will also be selling this “bundle” of ingredients at our stores April 11 – 17.

The Plant-Powered Cook-Along IS posted on our YouTube channel. Click the link below to access the video!

CLICK HERE TO FOR THE COOK A-LONG ON YOUTUBE!

 

Here’s what you’ll need for the Cook Along!

Ingredient Shopping List:

Food Ingredients:
 1 medium yellow onion
 Fresh cilantro
 2 large red bell peppers
 8 oz. crimini mushrooms
 Avocado
 Lime
 1 pound lean ground beef
 2 cans (15 oz.) BUSH’S® Black Beans, drained
 1 can (15 oz.) crushed tomatoes
 1 can (11oz.) yellow kernel corn, drained
 16 yellow corn tortillas
 1 package (1 oz.) taco seasoning mix, 25% less sodium
 Light sour cream
 2 cups shredded low-fat Mexican cheese blend
 1 cup shredded low-fat Mozzarella cheese
 Instant brown rice

Pantry Staples:
 Olive oil
 Cooking spray

 

CLICK HERE TO ADD INGREDIENTS TO ONLINE SHOPPING CART

Here are the Recipes!

Plant-Powered Black Bean and Beef Blend

Make Once – Eat Twice! Blend yields approximately 8 cups which can be used in our Mexican Lasagna and Burrito Stuffed Peppers recipes below.

Prep time: 20 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 medium yellow onion
  • 8 oz. crimini mushrooms
  • 1 pound lean ground beef
  • 1 TBSP olive oil
  • 2 cans (15 oz.) BUSH’S® Black Beans, drained
  • 1 package (1 oz.) taco seasoning mix, 25% less sodium
  • 1 can (15 oz.) crushed tomatoes
  • 1 can (11oz.) yellow kernel corn, drained

Directions:

  1.  Pulse onion and mushrooms in food processor until coarse texture. Set aside.
  2.  In large frying pan, brown ground beef. Drain fat. Set ground beef aside in separate bowl.
  3.  In same frying pan, heat oil. Add onions and mushrooms from food processor and sauté for 3-4 minutes or until most of the moisture has been released. Add the black beans and mix.
  4.  Add the cooked ground beef, taco seasoning, crushed tomatoes and corn to the black bean and mushroom blend. Mix and cook until heated through.
  5.  Set aside 2 cups for Burrito Stuffed Peppers and 6 cups for Mexican Lasagna.

Nutrition information (per ½ cup serving): 113 calories, 4.5 g fat, 11 g carbohydrate, 3 g fiber, 9 g protein, 218 mg sodium

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mexican Lasagna

Makes 6-8 servings

Ingredients:

  • Approx. 6 cups Plant-Powered Black Bean and Beef Blend
  • 16 yellow corn tortillas
  • 1 -2 cups shredded low-fat Mexican cheese blend

Directions:

  1.  Preheat oven to 350°F.
  2.  Spray bottom of an 9X13 baking dish with vegetable cooking spray. Place 4 corn tortillas on bottom of baking dish and layer approx. 2 cups Plant-Powered Black Bean and Beef Blend on top; Repeat layers ending with tortillas as top layer. Top with cheese.
  3.  Bake uncovered for 25 minutes until cheese melts and casserole is heated through.
  4.  Top with light sour cream or diced avocado if desired.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Burrito Stuffed Peppers

Makes 4 pepper halves

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups Plant-powered Black Bean and Beef Blend
  • 1 cup cooked brown rice
  • 2 large red bell peppers
  • 1 cup shredded low-fat Mozzarella cheese

Directions:

  1.  Preheat oven to 350°F. In a large bowl, mix together cooked rice and prepared Plant-Powered Black Bean and Chicken Blend.
  2.  Cut peppers in half lengthwise and remove seeds. Place cut side up in a 9 x 13 baking dish.
  3.  Spoon blend mixture into each pepper half (approximately ½ cup in each). Sprinkle each pepper with 2 tablespoons shredded cheese.
  4.  Cover baking dish with foil and bake for 30 minutes or until peppers are softened.

Add additional toppings as desired: Salsa, Cilantro Sour Cream (recipe below), Diced Avocado.

Cilantro Sour Cream Recipe Mix 1 cup low fat sour cream, 6 Tbsps. fresh chopped cilantro and 2 Tbsps. lime juice in small bowl. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.

 

 

 

Sign up to participate in our Plant-Powered Earth Day Cook-Along!

We’ll be posting the Cook-Along on YouTube April 19-April 25. Our Dietians Shari and Annette will show how to create Plant-Powered Black Beans and Beef along with two recipes using this blend.

We’ll email you an ingredient shopping list and link to the video when it is live!

5 Things You Need to Know about Protecting the Planet

For many of us, how our daily decisions impact planet health is just as important as how they impact our personal health. Choices we make, such as carpooling, using recyclable grocery bags, or choosing LED light bulbs, all have impact on the planet. With Earth Day celebrated worldwide later this month, it’s the perfect time to consider how our daily decisions impact planet health and what we can each do to make a difference.

#1: Carbon Footprint measures impact on the planet.

You’ve likely heard the term carbon footprint, which is a measure of the greenhouse gases (including carbon dioxide and methane) that are generated by our daily actions. Carbon footprint can be measured on an individual, a household, a company, or a food product as it is grown on the farm and travels to your table. High greenhouse gases contribute to global warming.

#2: Certain actions increase carbon footprint.

The four biggest ways to decrease carbon footprint and to fight for a clean environment are to lower the number of people on the planet, use cars less, travel less by airplanes, and eat more plant-based foods.

#3: Small changes over time add up to big results.

Decisions we make every day, when done consistently, can add up to big impact on planet health over time. For example, with spring in the air, consider line drying clothes outside or starting a compost bin in your back yard. For more inspiration, consider our 30 Ways to Take Care of the Earth.

#4: Earth Day is celebrated on April 22.

Started as an environmental movement more than 50 years ago, citizens around the world take action on Earth Day to raise awareness of planet health. Click here to learn more about local activities that may be happening in your area in celebration of Earth Day.

#5: Buehler’s cares.

As a part of our commitment to planet health, we are featuring displays of plant-powered foods in our stores during April. The plastic bags used in our stores are made from recycled materials. And don’t forget about our plastic bag recycling bins, available at the front of every store.

Working together, Buehler’s and our valued shoppers, we can make strides in protecting the planet, environment, and natural resources.